WALK WITH US TO TURN TYPE ONE INTO TYPE NONE

YOUR SUPPORT WILL HELP FUND LIFE-CHANGING RESEARCH

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Walk to Cure Diabetes is now JDRF One Walk

JDRF One Walk is the new name of the Walk to Cure Diabetes. We’ve changed the name of the world’s biggest type 1 diabetes fundraising event to share our focus on creating a world without T1D. The new name and global outlook of JDRF One Walk is a reminder of the powerful impact you can make by joining the global leader in T1D research.

Each year, JDRF Walks across the world bring together around a million people to raise over $85 million for life-changing T1D research. This success is only possible because of the support, commitment and strength of our community. Please register today.

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What drives us

JDRF exists for the millions of children, adults, and families affected by T1D every day. Their determination to overcome this disease inspires us and strengthens our resolve to create a world without T1D.

What separates us

JDRF is the T1D research organisation with the plan, influence and ability to not just deliver hope, but a series of life-changing therapies that will progressively remove the burden of T1D.

What propels us

JDRF combines engaging fundraising and hands-on collaboration with a broad range of scientific, regulatory, and corporate partners, toward improving the lives of those living with T1D and, ultimately, finding a cure.

Rob Invites You to One Walk

TV’s Rob Palmer is a big supporter of JDRF One Walk.

“I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when I was 7 and for me it’s important to be upbeat about this disease, I’ve tried not to let it hold me back.”

“JDRF One Walk is a great way to join with our T1D community and do something positive to support medical research. It’s a fun family day where T1D is the main event. What could be better than that?”

Join Rob Palmer at JDRF One Walk this year. Register now.

We're the walk to change the future type.

Why Walk?

JDRF exists for the millions of children, adults and families challenged by type 1 diabetes (T1D) every single day. Their determination to overcome this chronic, life-threatening disease strengthens ours to end it.

T1D is an autoimmune disease in which a person's pancreas loses the ability to produce insulin—a hormone essential to turning food into energy. It strikes both children and adults suddenly and is unrelated to diet and lifestyle. It requires constant carbohydrate counting, blood-glucose testing and lifelong dependence on injected insulin.

JDRF is the largest nongovernment funder of T1D research. We are uniquely positioned to advance groundbreaking therapies through the research pipeline to better treat and, one day, even prevent and cure T1D. But we can't do it without you.

By participating in a JDRF Walk, your fundraising ensures that JDRF can continue funding critical T1D research. Together, we can walk to the finish. And turn Type One into Type None.

Find out more about JDRF Research

Mudgee
Saturday 17th October, 2015
Sydney
Sunday 15th November, 2015
Tamworth
Sunday 18th October, 2015
Tweed Heads
Sunday 18th October, 2015
Newcastle
Sunday 25th October, 2015
Central Coast
Sunday 8th November, 2015
Wollongong
Sunday 8th November, 2015

Walk to Cure Diabetes is now JDRF One Walk

JDRF One Walk is the new name of the Walk to Cure Diabetes. We have changed the name of the world’s biggest type 1 diabetes (T1D) fundraising event to share our focus on creating a world without T1D. The new name and global outlook of JDRF One Walk is a reminder of the powerful impact you can make by joining the global leader in T1D research.

JDRF One Walk in New South Wales

New South Wales makes an important contribution to the world’s biggest event for type 1 diabetes. Thousands of members of our community come together in the country and the city to support the best research, in this state and around Australia.

We're the walk to change the future type.

Highlights from JDRF research in New South Wales

A JDRF supported researcher from Sydney has developed insulin-producing cells from liver cells, which have been engineered to release insulin on demand. The Sydney team is now working with an American biotech company to combine the insulin producing cells with their new encapsulation technology. Encapsulation is needed to keep the cells alive in a person with T1D. Human clinical trials are a few years away and this is a promising potential cure for T1D.

The artificial pancreas fires the imagination of the T1D community, and it’s not far away. The seamless control of BGLs through automatic adjustments of insulin would revolutionise diabetes management. A team of engineers and JDRF-funded scientists from Newcastle and the Hunter have recently developed a portable device that’s “smarter” than other contenders and uses existing smartphone technology. A clinical trial is planned for 2015.

Melbourne
Sunday 11th October, 2015
Geelong
Sunday 11th October, 2015
Shepparton
Sunday 11th October, 2015
Warrnambool
Sunday 11th October, 2015
Birchip
Sunday 4th October, 2015
Mount Martha
Sunday 8th November, 2015

Walk to Cure Diabetes is now JDRF One Walk

JDRF One Walk is the new name of the Walk to Cure Diabetes. We have changed the name of the world’s biggest type 1 diabetes (T1D) fundraising event to share our focus on creating a world without T1D. The new name and global outlook of JDRF One Walk is a reminder of the powerful impact you can make by joining the global leader in T1D research.

JDRF One Walk in Victoria and Tasmania

Victoria and Tasmania make an important contribution to the world’s biggest event for type 1 diabetes. Thousands of members of our community come together in the country and the city to support the best research, in this state and around Australia.

We're the walk to change the future type.

Highlights from JDRF research in Victoria

JDRF-funded researchers in Melbourne made a world-first discovery recently by finding rogue immune cells at ‘the scene of the crime’ in a donor pancreas. Researchers needed to understand more about how the killer cells behave, to understand why insulin-producing cells are destroyed. This understanding is now possible due to this discovery, so the development of immune therapies to stop the destruction is a step closer, and may one day help to prevent T1D.

Melbournians are helping to move the Artificial Pancreas forward with an in-home trial of an artificial pancreas system that uses smartphone technology to monitor their insulin needs. These trial participants are enjoying a short holiday from finger prick checks and insulin calculations with an innovative system that includes a smartphone controller, a glucose sensor under the skin that instructs an insulin pump every five minutes as to how much to dispense. Once the system is reliable and benefits are proven, JDRF hopes that all people with T1D can enjoy this holiday, every day of the year.

Pialba
Saturday 29th August, 2015
Roma
Sunday 11th October, 2015
Redlands
Sunday 18th October, 2015
Brisbane
Sunday 25th October, 2015
Mackay
Sunday 25th October, 2015
Noosa
Sunday 29th November, 2015
Townsville
Sunday 30th August, 2015
Woorabinda
Thursday 12th November, 2015

Walk to Cure Diabetes is now JDRF One Walk

JDRF One Walk is the new name of the Walk to Cure Diabetes. We have changed the name of the world’s biggest type 1 diabetes (T1D) fundraising event to share our focus on creating a world without T1D. The new name and global outlook of JDRF One Walk is a reminder of the powerful impact you can make by joining the global leader in T1D research.

JDRF One Walk in Queensland and Northern Territory

Queensland makes an important contribution to the world’s biggest event for type 1 diabetes. Thousands of members of our community come together in the country and the city to support the best research, in this state and around Australia.

We're the walk to change the future type.

Highlights from JDRF research in Queensland

JDRF-funded Queenslander Professor Nathan Ephron AC was recently recognised with a Companion in the Order of Australia for his services to medical research. The Professor has received funding from the US government to support his study into using a special microscope on the eyes can provide early warning of neuropathy. If the technique is proven effective, people with T1D could undergo regular screening and get early treatment, avoiding more serious outcomes.

The Australian ENDIA study is the only one of its kind in the world, and has been funded by JDRF to follow pregnant women whose unborn baby will have an immediate relative with T1D, such as mum, dad, or a sibling. Researchers will track environmental factors such as food exposures, body composition, the timing and frequency of viral illnesses and the types of bacteria in the gut. This is exciting because if we can understand exactly what in our environment is either harming or protecting us, we can develop strategies to prevent T1D.

Canberra
Saturday 14th, November 2015

Walk to Cure Diabetes is now JDRF One Walk

JDRF One Walk is the new name of the Walk to Cure Diabetes. We have changed the name of the world’s biggest type 1 diabetes (T1D) fundraising event to share our focus on creating a world without T1D. The new name and global outlook of JDRF One Walk is a reminder of the powerful impact you can make by joining the global leader in T1D research.

JDRF One Walk in the Australian Capital Territory

The ACT makes an important contribution to the world’s biggest event for type 1 diabetes. Thousands of members of our community come together in the country and the city to support the best research, in this state and around Australia.

We're the walk to change the future type.

Highlights from JDRF research in Australian Capital Territory

ACT researchers funded by JDRF discovered that insulin-producing cells have an unusually high level of a complex sugar called HS, which helps them survive. Part of the immune attack in the development of T1D is an attack on HS, so these researchers are looking for ways to defend or replace HS, which could be a pathway to a cure for T1D. The researchers are now planning ways to begin trials of this research on humans.

The Australian ENDIA study is the only one of its kind in the world, and has been funded by JDRF to follow pregnant women whose unborn baby will have an immediate relative with T1D, such as mum, dad, or a sibling. Researchers will track environmental factors such as food exposures, body composition, the timing and frequency of viral illnesses and the types of bacteria in the gut. This is exciting because if we can understand exactly what in our environment is either harming or protecting us, we can develop strategies to prevent T1D.

Launceston
Saturday 24th October, 2015
Hobart
Sunday 25th October, 2015

Walk to Cure Diabetes is now JDRF One Walk

JDRF One Walk is the new name of the Walk to Cure Diabetes. We have changed the name of the world’s biggest type 1 diabetes (T1D) fundraising event to share our focus on creating a world without T1D. The new name and global outlook of JDRF One Walk is a reminder of the powerful impact you can make by joining the global leader in T1D research.

JDRF One Walk in Victoria and Tasmania

Victoria and Tasmania make an important contribution to the world’s biggest event for type 1 diabetes. Thousands of members of our community come together in the country and the city to support the best research, in this state and around Australia.

We're the walk to change the future type.

Highlights from JDRF research in Victoria

JDRF-funded researchers in Melbourne made a world-first discovery recently by finding rogue immune cells at ‘the scene of the crime’ in a donor pancreas. Researchers needed to understand more about how the killer cells behave, to understand why insulin-producing cells are destroyed. This understanding is now possible due to this discovery, so the development of immune therapies to stop the destruction is a step closer, and may one day help to prevent T1D.

Melbournians are helping to move the Artificial Pancreas forward with an in-home trial of an artificial pancreas system that uses smartphone technology to monitor their insulin needs. These trial participants are enjoying a short holiday from finger prick checks and insulin calculations with an innovative system that includes a smartphone controller, a glucose sensor under the skin that instructs an insulin pump every five minutes as to how much to dispense. Once the system is reliable and benefits are proven, JDRF hopes that all people with T1D can enjoy this holiday, every day of the year.

Fannie Bay
Wednesday 14th October, 2015

Walk to Cure Diabetes is now JDRF One Walk

JDRF One Walk is the new name of the Walk to Cure Diabetes. We have changed the name of the world’s biggest type 1 diabetes (T1D) fundraising event to share our focus on creating a world without T1D. The new name and global outlook of JDRF One Walk is a reminder of the powerful impact you can make by joining the global leader in T1D research.

JDRF One Walk in Queensland and Northern Territory

Queensland makes an important contribution to the world’s biggest event for type 1 diabetes. Thousands of members of our community come together in the country and the city to support the best research, in this state and around Australia.

We're the walk to change the future type.

Highlights from JDRF research in Queensland

JDRF-funded Queenslander Professor Nathan Ephron AC was recently recognised with a Companion in the Order of Australia for his services to medical research. The Professor has received funding from the US government to support his study into using a special microscope on the eyes can provide early warning of neuropathy. If the technique is proven effective, people with T1D could undergo regular screening and get early treatment, avoiding more serious outcomes.

The Australian ENDIA study is the only one of its kind in the world, and has been funded by JDRF to follow pregnant women whose unborn baby will have an immediate relative with T1D, such as mum, dad, or a sibling. Researchers will track environmental factors such as food exposures, body composition, the timing and frequency of viral illnesses and the types of bacteria in the gut. This is exciting because if we can understand exactly what in our environment is either harming or protecting us, we can develop strategies to prevent T1D.

Mount Barker
Saturday 7th November, 2015
Mount Gambier
Sunday 15th November, 2015
Adelaide
Sunday 18th October, 2015

Walk to Cure Diabetes is now JDRF One Walk

JDRF One Walk is the new name of the Walk to Cure Diabetes. We have changed the name of the world’s biggest type 1 diabetes (T1D) fundraising event to share our focus on creating a world without T1D. The new name and global outlook of JDRF One Walk is a reminder of the powerful impact you can make by joining the global leader in T1D research.

JDRF One Walk in South Australia

South Australia makes an important contribution to the world’s biggest event for type 1 diabetes. Thousands of members of our community come together in the country and the city to support the best research, in this state and around Australia.

We're the walk to change the future type.

Highlights from JDRF research in South Australia

The Australasian Diabetes Data Network collects data from thousands of people living with type 1 diabetes on a single purpose-built database. This JDRF-funded national database has now recruited 6000 patients, which is an Australian first. For the first time, researchers will be able to answer questions such as how type 1 diabetes changes as children grow up, when and why complications may develop, and how different types of T1D care can affect health and wellbeing.

The Australian ENDIA study is the only one of its kind in the world, and has been funded by JDRF to follow pregnant women whose unborn baby will have an immediate relative with T1D, such as mum, dad, or a sibling. Researchers will track environmental factors such as food exposures, body composition, the timing and frequency of viral illnesses and the types of bacteria in the gut. This is exciting because if we can understand exactly what in our environment is either harming or protecting us, we can develop strategies to prevent T1D.

Esperance
Sunday 1st November, 2015
Busselton
Sunday 25th October, 2015
Perth
Sunday 25th October, 2015
Mandurah
Sunday 29th November, 2015

Walk to Cure Diabetes is now JDRF One Walk

JDRF One Walk is the new name of the Walk to Cure Diabetes. We have changed the name of the world’s biggest type 1 diabetes (T1D) fundraising event to share our focus on creating a world without T1D. The new name and global outlook of JDRF One Walk is a reminder of the powerful impact you can make by joining the global leader in T1D research.

JDRF One Walk in Western Australia

Western Australia makes an important contribution to the world’s biggest event for type 1 diabetes. Thousands of members of our community come together in the country and the city to support the best research, in this state and around Australia.

We're the walk to change the future type.

Highlights from JDRF research in Western Australia

A West Australian boy was the first in the world to access a new advance in Artificial Pancreas Systems recently. The new insulin pump system is being trialled in Perth and at other sites around Australia. The new pump model will stop insulin delivery in response to the likely direction of BGLs. It’s the first technology that can shut off insulin up to 30 minutes before a predicted hypo, meaning that the hypo is avoided.

The Australian ENDIA study is the only one of its kind in the world, and has been funded by JDRF to follow pregnant women whose unborn baby will have an immediate relative with T1D, such as mum, dad, or a sibling. Researchers will track environmental factors such as food exposures, body composition, the timing and frequency of viral illnesses and the types of bacteria in the gut. This is exciting because if we can understand exactly what in our environment is either harming or protecting us, we can develop strategies to prevent T1D.

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